Friday, 18 November 2016

Wagon loads

I wouldn't say that it's a hate, but I don't like to see layouts full of empty wagons. I find it puzzling that many go to extreme lengths to super detail and weather using expensive bits of airbrush kit and then run the things with nothing inside. At the moment there are about ten wagons available for 'Y Fan' and about the same again in the kits box, most picked up at half or less price from rummage boxes. It was time to fill a few up.
This is a fairly standard Coopercraft five plank merchandise wagon and somewhere in the photo collection I've got a shot of rough sawn pit props stacked vertically in such a beast - can I find it? Can I hell. Anyway I can't remember ever seeing it done on a model before.  Simple enough, but not a fast job. a baseplate cut to the internal dimensions and over seventy toffee apple sticks of about 4mm square and 18mm long stuck on.
The fictional base to this is that the station is possibly a 1/4 mile up the line from the obligatory colliery. There is a facing siding into part of this so odd bits of traffic , mainly maintenance, come into Y Fan with the general goods to be dropped off on the way back. The result is that there are now two of these wagon loads to run.

3 comments:

  1. It's amazing how many pit props one wagon can hold isn't it!

    http://philsworkbench.blogspot.co.uk/2016/07/making-pit-props.html

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  3. There's an interesting variation on this in Jim Russell's freight wagon loads book.....a sort of wall (mini Woodhenge?) has been built around the perimeter of a GWR 4-plank open with roughly sawn planks, to over twice the height of the wagon body, this holds the rest of the load of sawn timber (laid flat) safely, although the author does ask how they managed to load this lot in the wagon!
    S.
    Edited due spellchecker thinking it knows best! Grrr......

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